FBI arrests ‘high-heeled hijacker’ for series of Texas robberies and kidnapping

Dubbed the “high-heeled hijacker” by the FBI, a Texas woman has been arrested for her alleged role in a series of robberies and a kidnapping, federal authorities have announced.

Lisa Marie Coleman, 58, earned her nickname thanks to the fancy shoes she wore for at least one of the flights.

“It’s not very common, so we thought the high-heeled hijacker would be the perfect nickname,” Christina Garza of FBI Houston’s office told The Post.

A person she stole from described the woman as being well-dressed but smelling “strongly” of body odor, according to Houston police.

Coleman’s crime spree began Nov. 15 when investigators said she approached Galleria Houston employee Katie Otten in the mall parking lot and demanded money, KTRK reported. The thief had her hand in her pocket, leading Otten to believe that Coleman was armed.

“It’s a robbery, I have a gun and I want your money,” Otten told the Houston station. “She forced her way into my vehicle and said, ‘OK, take me to an ATM. “”

The hijacker then forced the terrified woman to go to several ATMs before making a final stop at a grocery store.

Lisa Marie Coleman was known for her fancy shoes.


Coleman was involved in a series of robberies

Coleman was allegedly involved in a series of robberies.


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Coleman was charged with kidnapping and three counts of robbery by threat.

Coleman was charged with kidnapping and three counts of robbery by threat.


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Lisa Marie Coleman
Lisa Marie Coleman was given the nickname “The High-Heeled Hijacker” by the FBI.
Houston Police Robbery

“I told him I wasn’t going to leave Randalls [pharmacy and grocery] with her, ā€¯recalls the victim. “I said to him, ‘You have the keys to the car, take the car, go do whatever you want.'”

Coleman took the phone, keys, and $160 from Otten and drove off.

In the days leading up to Christmas, Coleman was also behind robberies at a sandwich shop, hotel and bank, according to cops. Each time she used a similar pattern – passing staff members a note ordering them to give her money and threatening violence, police said.


Coleman showed a note to a cashier demanding money, which landed him on a charge of theft by threat.
Coleman showed a note to a cashier demanding money, which landed him on a charge of theft by threat.
Houston Police Robbery

Ultimately, Coleman was arrested on unrelated charges, but a tip linked her to the robberies, federal authorities confirmed.

She has since been charged with kidnapping and three counts of robbery by threat.

Meanwhile, federal agents in Houston are looking for the “Pocket Pillager” – a different bank robber who has been nicknamed because the strategy works so well.

“We learned very quickly that it’s a smart tactic to give them names because the public hangs on to them,” the FBI spokeswoman said.

“Some people, when we confront them, literally said, ‘Yeah, I’m the nickname we gave them,'” Garza added.

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